Some Books by C.S. Lewis

A contribution by Bruce Wilkins (brucew@accel.net)


Regarding your request for the following info ...

There are a couple of chapters of two CS Lewis books that will meet your requirements.

I've only read two of his books, 'Mere Christianity' (most of) and 'Christian Reflections' (partial) but Lewis always presents a logical argument in a fashion so simple it makes my head spin. Not that logic will win the day if someone is determined to avoid meeting God, but in some cases (highly educated people?) it will compel someone to take a second look.

Mere Christianity

The first section of this three-part book is entitled 'Right and Wrong as a Clue to the Meaning of the Universe'. It explains a "law of human nature" in a manner similar to the law of gravity or other scientific law. He asks himself the obvious and difficult questions that any non-believer wants to ask and answers them in common language with unquestionable (to my mind) logic.

[Of interest may also be an atheist's commentary, Mere Assertions, Criticism of Mere Christianity, A.N>]

Christian Reflections

Upon reviewing this I don't think it would be suitable to someone who wasn't already a Christian. I think the reason I thought it would appeal to a scientific mind is because his thought processes are so intelligent and expressed in such simple language that it is usually quite enjoyable to read. I particularly enjoy his reasoning, and experiences, on why 'official' biblical scholarship and critique is so faulty and suspect. I always felt it was but I could never dispute the biblical scholars from my own experience.

Perhaps you have to read the essay 'Fern-Seed and Elephants' to understand what I mean. He explains his experience of having his books reviewed and a reviewers explanation of what must have been going through Lewis' mind to have written such a book. What the reviewer came up with, in a then contemporary book, was so far off the mark. How then, can they comment on writings thousands of years old? Maybe you've experienced this with your own writings.


my home page (http://www.mat.univie.ac.at/~neum)

Arnold Neumaier (Arnold.Neumaier@univie.ac.at)